Daniel P Aldrich, Northeastern University

 

Abstract

While idealized crisis response involves smooth coordination between relevant actors, friction between levels of government and between the state and civil society in responding to catastrophe may be more common. This article builds a theory of cross-level friction during and after crisis by analyzing the conditions when discord is most likely…

 

Introduction

All societies hope to minimize the casualties, property damage, and business interruption that come with disasters that, because of human induced-climate change, are becoming more costly. A number of policies reduce the human and economic costs of crises, including preventing settlement in vulnerable areas through zoning laws, wide scale evacuation before the event, and rapid and organized response from local and national authorities. Successful post-disaster outcomes are not as common as observers would like…

 

Keywords: Bottom up culture, Case studies, Disaster coordination, Qualitative comparative analysis, Tobit regression analysis, Top down institutions